KHN Morning Briefing

Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations.

Presidential Campaigns Jockey For Support From Seniors, Hispanic Voters

Press reports detail how both the Romney and Obama campaigns are taking steps to attract these voting blocs.

Reuters: Florida Bingo Set Will Go For Safest Net--But Whose?
Medicare and Social Security, the massive programs that pay benefits to tens of millions of older Americans, are contentious issues in the 2012 presidential campaign. Seniors want the nation's sputtering economy to be fixed, but not at their expense. In the midterm elections two years ago, one in five voters were over 65. If older Americans turn out in force this year, they could swing the presidential race. President Barack Obama and his GOP opponent, Mitt Romney, are neck and neck in current surveys (Roosevelt, 6/8).

The Associated Press: Obama Campaign Woos Hispanics With TV, Radio Ads
Her Latin American background is clear in her speech as Lynnette Acosta talks about how President Barack Obama's health care plan could help a diabetic neighbor. … The upbeat ad starring a Florida resident is one of several such spots the Democrat's team is running on Spanish-language stations in pivotal election states, and it contrasts sharply with the hard-hitting commercials in English that the incumbent's campaign is airing against Republican rival Mitt Romney (Fouhy, 6/9).

Meanwhile, the latest on Tuesday's special election to fill the congressional seat formerly held by Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz.

The Associated Press: GOP Focuses On Obama In Bid For Giffords' Seat
Voters are deciding in Tuesday's special election whether Republican Jesse Kelly, who narrowly lost to Giffords in 2010, or Democrat Ron Barber, a former Giffords aide asked by the lawmaker to pursue the seat, will complete the remainder of her term. … Kelly says he would seek to repeal Obama's health care overhaul law and oppose any effort to end the tax cuts enacted under President George W. Bush. Barber talks about changing some parts of the health law, requiring the wealthy to pay more to produce revenue and lowering taxes on the middle class (Freking and Berry, 6/11).

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