KHN Morning Briefing

Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations.

Already-Stressed Hospitals Worry About Funding Reductions For The Uninsured

Cuts in aid for emergency care for illegal immigrants is a primary concern for these hospitals, according to the New York Times. Meanwhile, Politico Pro reports on how some Republican governors are playing a Medicaid expansion "waiting game," and the Washington Post reports on the next wave of NFIB's strategies to undo the health law.   

The New York Times: Hospitals Are Worried About Cut In Fund For The Uninsured
President Obama's health care law is putting new strains on some of the nation's most hard-pressed hospitals, by cutting aid they use to pay for emergency care for illegal immigrants, which they have long been required to provide (Bernstein, 7/26).

Politico Pro: State Decisions On Medicaid Could Be A While
Holding your breath for clues on which states will expand Medicaid? You might want to exhale for a while. Republican governors appear to be playing a Medicaid waiting game  — and it may last months. GOP governors in 11 states say they’ll forgo a final decision at least until the Nov. 6 election, according to interviews with officials in governor’s offices and a review of statements and local news reports. Two more plan to hold out at least until the fall, although they wouldn’t specify whether a decision would come before Election Day (Cheney, 7/26).

The Washington Post: Health Care Fight Far From Over For NFIB
No one fought harder against the health care reform law than the National Federation of Independent Business, which led the legal charge against the divisive legislation all the way to the Supreme Court. Now, with the law upheld and the political spotlight turning back to tax relief and spending cuts, we wondered where the small business group would shift its attention and resources. Turns out, right back to health care (Harrison, 7/26).

Politico also reports on efforts to block the Obama administration contraception coverage requirement.

Politico: Religious Groups Seek To Block Birth Control Rule
A public interest law firm that represents conservative Christians is trying to get an emergency ruling to block the White House birth control coverage policy from going into effect next week. The Thomas More Law Center, based in Ann Arbor, Mich., said Thursday it had filed an emergency motion asking Federal District Judge Robert Cleland of the Eastern District of Michigan to stop the new requirement that most employers cover birth control in their employee health plan with no co-pay (Kenen, 7/26).

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.